Butterflies of the Adirondack Mountains: Silver-bordered Fritillary (Boloria selene) in the Paul Smiths VIC Native Species Butterfly House (16 June 2012)

Butterflies of the Adirondack Mountains:
Silver-bordered Fritillary (Boloria selene)

Butterflies of the Adirondack Mountains: Silver-bordered Fritillary (Boloria selene) in the Paul Smiths VIC Native Species Butterfly House (16 June 2012) Butterflies of the Adirondacks: Silver-bordered Fritillary (Boloria selene) in the Paul Smiths VIC Butterfly House (19 June 2012)

The Silver-bordered Fritillary (Boloria selene) is an orange and black butterfly that may be seen in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York in summer. It is a member of the Brushfoot family. [1] This butterfly is one of the lesser fritillaries. [2] [3] It is noticeably smaller than the other fritillaries seen at the Paul Smiths VIC Native Species Butterfly House. [4] Some sources refer to it as the Silver Meadow Fritillary,[5] while others refer to it as the Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary. [6] This butterfly reportedly is named after Selene, a lunar deity in Greek mythology. [7]

From above, the Silver-Bordered Fritillary is orange with black markings. The black margins enclose pale orange spots. [8] [9] From below, this butterfly has a silver border along both outer wing margins. [10] It also has four rows of metallic silver spots. [11] The wing span of the Silver-bordered Fritillary is about 1.6 inches. [12]

Male Silver-bordered Fritillaries patrol wet areas for females, [13] who lay their eggs singly near host plants. [14] Caterpillars feed on the leaves of violets. [15] [16] [17] Adult butterflies consume nectar from flowers such as goldenrod and black-eyed susans. [18]

The range of the Silver-bordered Fritillary extends from Alaska east to Newfoundland and south to Oregon, New Mexico, Illinois, and North Carolina. [19] Silver-bordered Fritillaries prefer wet areas, such as meadows and bog margins, often near wooded areas.[20] [21] It nectars in adjacent fields. [22]

In 2012, the Silver-bordered Fritillary was present in the Paul Smiths VIC Native Species Butterfly House in June.[23]

References

Explore the VIC

The Paul Smiths VIC offers a wide variety of programs throughout the year to educate and inform Adirondack Park residents and visitors about the natural wonders of the Adirondack Mountains. You can help support these programs by joining the Friends of the VIC. More information on Friends of the VIC memberships

Explore the Trails

The VIC trails are free and open to the public, from dawn to dusk, spring through fall. In winter, the trails are open to cross-country skiers and snowshoers for a fee. Day or season passes may be purchased.